What color is your snot? This says it about your health

The color of your snot can say a lot about your health. If you are healthy, your snot basically brightens, but it can happen that your snot is yellow, green, red, white or brown. What could be wrong then? We explain it.

What color is your snot? This says it about your health
The color of your snot can say a lot about your health. If you are healthy, your snot basically brightens, but it can happen that your snot is yellow, green, red, white or brown. What could be wrong then? We explain it.

What color is your snot? This says it about your health

 

The color of your snot can say a lot about your health. If you are healthy, your snot basically brightens, but it can happen that your snot is yellow, green, red, white or brown. What could be wrong then? We explain it.

 

What is snot anyway? According to the health net, snot is simply mucus. Your mouth, nose, throat, lungs, intestines and stomach are covered with mucosa. This consists of a layer of cells that produces mucus. Only when this mucus comes out of your nose is it snot.

 

Healthy snot

In general, "healthy" snot is clear and transparent. It should have a sticky structure, a bit like glue. With clear snot the chance is smaller that you carry a virus or infection with you.

 

Having a cold

Your snot can turn white if you have a cold. Your body produces more snot when you have a cold, which changes the color. It can also feel smoother and have a thicker structure. White snot can also have another reason: you eat too many dairy products. The fat in the dairy products makes your snot thicker and tougher.

 

Virus or infection

Does your snot have a yellow color? Then it is possible that your body is fighting a bacterium. The white blood cells are working hard to ensure that the bacteria leaves your body. At first your snot can be light in color, later it will probably turn darker.

 

Does your snot have a green color? This may indicate that a bacterial or fungal infection is active in your body. In this case too, the white blood cells are fighting the bacteria. Does your snot turn green for longer than a week? Then make an appointment with the doctor for a check-up.

 

Blood

If your snot is (light) red or (dark) brown, chances are that it contains blood. There is no reason to panic because there is a good chance that the vulnerable skin in your nose is damaged. That can't hurt so much, it heals by itself. If you also cough up red mucus, you may have bronchitis. Does this last for several days? Then go to the doctor.