Pregnancy and oral health

During your pregnancy you are more likely to get gum problems and cavities. In general you can prevent it with extra attention to the care of your teeth.

Pregnancy and oral health
During your pregnancy you are more likely to get gum problems and cavities. In general you can prevent it with extra attention to the care of your teeth.

Pregnancy and oral health

 

During your pregnancy you are more likely to get gum problems and cavities. In general you can prevent it with extra attention to the care of your teeth.

 

More chance of inflamed gums

You probably know the talk that every child costs a tooth. Fortunately that is not the case. Because of the pregnancy you have more chance of getting gum disease (gingivitis) in the mouth. The culprit is dental plaque. Due to an increased hormone level, your gums can react sensitively to plaque. This makes it bleed faster, swells and makes it more sensitive. Moreover, if you pay less attention to dental care and, for example, you eat more during your pregnancy, the chance of getting cavities increases.

 

Precautions for pregnancy

With proper dental care, your teeth do not have to suffer during pregnancy. Actually, it is a matter of continuing to brush carefully, twice a day. Also keep the spaces between the teeth and choose good clean with brushes, floss or toothpicks. The temptation is perhaps to relieve gums that are bleeding (and therefore inflamed). Moreover, it is tempting not to brush the back teeth in case of nausea. Keep these areas extra clean. A toothbrush with a small head is better tolerated in nausea. Do not use sweets and sugar-containing drinks too often. If necessary, visit your dentist or dental hygienist once more if you have any questions.

 

Note: excessive or incorrect use of oral hygiene aids can cause damage to teeth and gums

 

Nauseous

Often a pregnancy is accompanied by nausea. Some women are so sick that they have to vomit regularly. The temptation is to brush your teeth immediately afterwards to get rid of that bad taste in your mouth. But you shouldn't do that. Heartburn affects the tooth enamel. The brush and toothpaste also have an abrasive effect. If you brush your teeth immediately after vomiting, you can easily brush away the tooth enamel. Rinse your mouth better with water or a mouthwash.

 

Dental treatments during pregnancy

Tell your dentist or dental hygienist prior to the check that you are pregnant. For the first three months of pregnancy, he is reluctant to take X-rays to be sure. Sometimes extensive dental treatments are postponed until after the birth. But you can undergo most dental treatments without risk during pregnancy, even with anesthesia.

 

Take good care of the teeth

If the baby is there, you naturally also want to take good care of your child's teeth and oral health. That concern starts as soon as the first tooth is broken. The age at which children get their first teeth varies per child. The first baby tooth usually breaks through between six and nine months.

 

Tips for healthy dentures:

  • As soon as the first tooth is broken, brush carefully with a special children's toothbrush and use fluoride toothpaste.
  • Brush your child's teeth once a day until the second year. Start brushing twice a day from the second year.
  • Transfer from a baby bottle to a drinking cup as early as possible. Most children can learn to drink from a cup from the age of nine months. Limit the use of the baby bottle. Often small bits of juice sucking from a baby bottle can seriously affect the teeth.
  • Do not bring a bottle to bed. Not even with milk. Because milk also naturally contains sugar that can cause tooth decay. A bottle with water is not harmful.