In practice - People with a visual impairment

Points of attention in contact with the visually impaired. Many tips can also be used in the care of the visually impaired with a mental disability.

In practice - People with a visual impairment
Points of attention in contact with the visually impaired. Many tips can also be used in the care of the visually impaired with a mental disability.

In practice

 

The table below shows points for attention in contact with the visually impaired. Many tips can also be used in the care of the visually impaired with a mental disability.

 

Points of attention in contact with the visually impaired

Basic rules

 - Make contact

 - Match your communication to the person and what happens in the conversation

General and reception
Contact

 - Give your name when you greet a visually impaired patient

- Ask if and how you can help; do not insist if your help is not needed

 - Respond with words and tell what you are doing: a visually impaired does not see your gesture or smile; do not just touch the visually impaired patient

 - When you start talking to the visually impaired, first name his name so that he knows you're talking to him

Space

 - Realize that visually impaired people cannot see a line in front of the counter; so they cannot see where to wait until their turn

 - Provide information about the room: tell the visually impaired where he can sit (in the waiting room) or where the treatment chair is located; tell which people are in the treatment room

Safety

 - Make sure there are no furniture or objects that visually impaired people might bump into or stumble over, such as a bag, a non-attached chair, toys, etc. do not leave doors open

 - If a visually impaired person has to go up or down stairs, announce that there is a staircase going up or down; tell where the handrail is or ask if you can put his hand on the handrail; also announce when the stairs end

 - Ask if it is nice that you walk to the treatment room or consultation room; if so, ask if he wants to hold your shoulder or elbow to follow you; walk something for the visually impaired

In the consultation room, the treatment room or at the desk
Who  - Tell who is present in the consultation room / treatment room
What

 - Let the visually impaired know what will happen so that he is not frightened; with oral care you touch the place where you are going to treat; for example, you touch the upper right cheek to let you know that you are going to check, brush or treat the upper right quadrant

 - Are you aware of the limitations that low vision can mean for your own control; consult with the patient what is feasible and discuss possible solutions

Language

 - Avoid words like "here" and "there"; give directions such as: "the cup of water to rinse your mouth is diagonally to the left in front of you (or: is at ten o'clock)"; if you tap the glass for a moment, the visually impaired can hear where the glass is

 - You can use words such as "seeing" and "looking"; that is normal spoken language

If you leave  - Let them know that you are leaving, so that the visually impaired does not speak "in the void"