Health problems of migrants - Migrants

Health problems of migrants - Migrants
Migrants on average have a poorer health than native Dutch. We give some examples. The percentage of people with diabetes is two to five times higher among migrants than among native Dutch people. In the second and third generation of migrants, the percentage of people with diabetes decreases.

Health problems of migrants

 

Migrants on average have a poorer health than native Dutch. We give some examples. The percentage of people with diabetes is two to five times higher among migrants than among native Dutch people. In the second and third generation of migrants, the percentage of people with diabetes decreases. Hypertension is more common among Surinamese and Turks than among native Dutch. With Hindustani Surinamese three times as much as with native Dutch. People from West Africa (Ghanaians, Nigerians) and South Africa more often have hypertension, which moreover leads to (kidney) complications. In addition, they respond less well to the most prescribed medication (diuretics, calcium antagonists and beta-blockers).

 

Diseases among migrants (source www.volksgezondheidenzorg.info)

 

  Turkish Moroccans Surinamese Antillians Other non-Western migrants
Diabetes + + +    
Depression + +      
Schizophrenia 0 + + +  
Experienced health - - - -  
Mortality around the birth + + + +  
Infant mortality + + + +  
Maternal mortality + - ++ ++ ++

 

+ = more than with native Dutch people; - = less than with native Dutch people; 0 = as often as with native Dutch people.

 

 

Lifestyle and health risks

  • Turkish men smoke the most (and lung cancer is the most common in this group), followed by Surinamese. Moroccan men smoke the least often. Alcohol use among non-Western migrants is low, among Eastern Europeans high.
  • The first generation of Turkish and Moroccan migrants scores low on movement, especially the elderly.
  • Vitamin D deficiency occurs in people with dark skin color, especially if they cover a large part of their body.
  • Genital mutilation (female circumcision) occurs in Africa (Egypt, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, countries in West Africa) and in Asia (Indonesia). Consequences of genital mutilation are urinary tract infections, severe menstrual complaints, problems with pregnancy and childbirth.
  • The sensitivity to certain medicines differs. Sometimes medicines are broken down faster, which means that there is a chance of under treatment for Ethiopians, for example. Sometimes they are broken down more slowly, so that people in Asia, for example, have the chance of overdose. This variation in degradation rate occurs mainly in antidepressants, antipsychotics, beta-blockers, rosuvastine and some anti-cancer medicines.

 

Medicines and ethnicity

Ethnicity affects the degradation rate of certain commonly used drugs. You should think of antidepressants, antipsychotics and metoprolol.

 

  • Asians (including some Turkish groups) break down tricyclic antidepressants, haloperidol and codeine less quickly (slow metaboliser). At the same time, 10% of Turks are a fast metabolist.
  • Antidepressants work less well with African-Americans; probably also in Creoles and people with roots in West and South Africa.
  • The chance that paroxetine is broken down so quickly that it is not effective, is 1% among native Dutch, 10% among Spaniards and 30% among Ethiopians.
  • Antilleans (and people with roots in West and South Africa) are more likely to experience movement disorders when using antipsychotics.

 

(Source: http://www.huisarts-migrant.nl)