Cooperation, laws and regulations - Dementia sufferers

When the person suffering from dementia reaches a phase in which he or she is no longer competent, a legal representative is appointed. Usually it is the partner or one of the children. He is authorized to make decisions about finance, housing and care. But problems often arise before a legal representative is appointed.

Cooperation, laws and regulations - Dementia sufferers
When the person suffering from dementia reaches a phase in which he or she is no longer competent, a legal representative is appointed. Usually it is the partner or one of the children. He is authorized to make decisions about finance, housing and care. But problems often arise before a legal representative is appointed.

Cooperation, laws and regulations

 

When the person suffering from dementia reaches a phase in which he or she is no longer competent, a legal representative is appointed. Usually it is the partner or one of the children. He is authorized to make decisions about finance, housing and care. But problems often arise before a legal representative is appointed. If it becomes too dangerous to live at home, forced admission is required. The Special Admissions Act in Psychiatric Hospitals that regulates this (Bopz) is actually not suitable for the situation of people suffering from dementia. This law will be replaced by the Care and Coercion Act. They will arrange involuntary care for people with dementia and people with a mental disability.

 

Cooperation, neighborhood teams, transmural care

For cooperation, social neighborhood teams and transmural care for the frail elderly in general, see the chapter 'Elderly, chronically ill and people with physical limitations'.

 

Dementia-specific is the dementia network, which is present in many regions. You can find regional networks via the National Dementia Network (http://www.beteroud.nl/ouderen/lnd-landelijk-netwerk-dementie.html). The network is organized differently in each region. The range of support for people with dementia and informal carers also differs greatly per region. We know among other things: contact with fellow sufferers, meeting centers such as Alzheimer's cafés, day care, respite care and courses dealing with dementia.

 

Many people with dementia have a case manager. Due to changes in the organization of care, it is unclear whether this function will be retained after 2016 and possibly who will take over their duties.