Clean working with a Bodytray - Capita selecta

Clean working with a Bodytray - Capita selecta
From an ergonomic perspective, it is recommended to apply the principle of Four Handed Dentistry (FHD) in patient treatments. The practitioner will then receive all instruments and materials provided by the dental assistant. The most logical place to place the instruments is then on the patient's chest. Direct contact with the patient is not allowed, however, that location may be used to position a Bodytray as an intermediary.

Clean working with a Bodytray

 

From an ergonomic perspective, it is recommended to apply the principle of Four Handed Dentistry (FHD) in patient treatments. The practitioner will then receive all instruments and materials provided by the dental assistant. The most logical place to place the instruments is then on the patient's chest. Direct contact with the patient is not allowed, however, that location may be used to position a Bodytray as an intermediary.

 

A Body Tray is a sort of 'stand-up table' that can be placed on the patient's chest. The top consists of a metal blade with raised edges along the long sides. A treatment tray fits exactly in between. The underside consists of a movable reservoir with polystyrene granules, allowing the body tray to be placed horizontally. If the patient's chest is too steep, a fill-up roll can be used as an addition. The Bodytray is therefore universally applicable, both for adults, but also for children.

 

A Bodytray in situ with treatment tray. B Body tray at the start of treatment, only with dispotray. C Body trays after completing child care, only with dispotray

 

A clean and simple method for using this handy aid is described below in word and image.

 

Cover up:

 

A-G On Bodytray decks step by step

 

  • The Bodytray is picked up with disinfected hands and placed in a protective cover with laminated inside (matching size of head support bag).
  • The Body Tray is installed on the patient's chest, with disinfected hands or (already) with clean gloves at the start of treatment.

 

 

If the Bodytray should come into contact with the naked skin in low-cut clothing, a tissue can first be applied over the décolleté.

 

  • A plasticized patient napkin is torn slightly with clean hands or with clean gloves. The tear is folded into a V-shape. For example, the napkin may hang slightly over the Body Tray along the neck of the patient. This makes the Bodytray extra protected on this side and the practitioner can possibly use the napkin to wipe something.
  • The napkin is placed on the body tray, so that in principle the entire body tray is covered (protected!).
  • The fully covered (dispo) tray is placed on the Body tray.

 

The dispotray can possibly be supported with a standard tray, which, however, adds nothing functional and only entails additional operations for the reconditioning of the tray.

 

Clearing:

 

A-O Clearing Bodytray step by step

 

 

  • At the end of the treatment, the (dispo) tray is used as usual as a collection point for the dirty materials and corner pieces. If necessary, the instruments and materials of the (demarcated) worksheet are also added if the space on the tray permits.
  • The overhanging patient napkin is picked up at the sides and from below of the Bodytray.
  • Transport the whole to the collection box.
  • Take a pair of tweezers from the tray.
  • Lift the lid with the tweezers until it is stable behind the container.
  • Only pick up the tray and place it in the collection box.
  • Grab the patient napkin without touching the environment of the worktop.
  • Process the napkin into a wad and throw it into the collection box or a hands-free trash if it is under hand (!) Range.
  • Pull the gloves off and also throw them on the tray in the collection box or directly into a trash can if it is within reach.
  • Take the lid on the (clean) sides.
  • Close the lid on the collection box.

 

Remove Body Tray:

 

A. By the practitioner:

 

A The assistant will take the dispotray plus the napkin. B With a bare (clean!) hand the practitioner removes the Bodytray

 

After the assistant has removed the napkin plus the tray, the practitioner can take the Bodytray from the patient's chest with a bare hand and store it on a clean piece of the work area.

 

B. By the assistant:

 

The assistant pulls off the gloves and removes the whole bodytray, napkin plus (diso) tray with bare hands. The Body tray is 'released' on a clean piece of the worktop and napkin with tray is brought to the collection box. The opening of the collection box then takes place with the bare hands on the (clean) sides of the lid, as well as closing.

 

Assistant removes the dispotray, including the napkin plus the Bodytray

 

The weight on the dispotray makes the stability somewhat less, so that preferably only a small distance to a collection box on the worktop seems possible.

 

However, it will never happen that the dispotray 'does not keep it'. The material will only bend, luckily not break.

 

Dispotray will only bend a little when loaded, never break