Call structure - Contact

Call structure - Contact
In professional conversations you can recognize the following structure: opening / core / rounding. Sometimes you can prepare a conversation. This can be important if you see a patient more often and accompany him. We do not discuss this preparation here.

Call structure

 

In professional conversations you can recognize the following structure: opening / core / rounding. Sometimes you can prepare a conversation. This can be important if you see a patient more often and accompany him. We do not discuss this preparation here.

 

Opening

When you make contact with your patient, verbally or non-verbally, you start a working relationship with him. It does not matter whether you have that patient on the phone, or whether he is at the desk or in the treatment room. You introduce, ask, name or repeat the name of the patient. This way you let the patient know that you will try to help him. A patient who feels welcome and notices that he is paying attention to them will be more easily open to you and the help you offer. This way you create a cooperative relationship with your patient.

 

After you have made contact, ask for the reason for the arrival or the phone call. With a planned appointment you often already know that reason, but it is good to check whether it is true what has been noted. You can also check whether there are other things that the patient wants to discuss. Then you can draw up the 'diary' of the conversation together.

 

 

Core part

Here you discuss the parts of the diary and if necessary carry out actions. You work patient-oriented, so you fit in with the needs of the patient. You can follow the steps of the information arrow: being open / understanding / wanting / being / doing / continuing to do. Make sure that it is really a conversation, not one-way traffic. You round off with a conclusion or summary: 'we discussed ... and you indicated ...' You can also ask the patient to mention the most important points in the conversation. If you have given advice, you can ask whether the patient understands what he can do and whether it will succeed.

 

Rounding

You finish the conversation. Sometimes you make a (new) appointment or explain when the patient needs to contact you earlier. Then you say hello and say goodbye.

 

If you carefully complete a contact, the chances are that the patient feels well treated, is satisfied and does something with your information or advice. Careful completion is also required as a 'bridge' to a subsequent contact. The patient and you can start with a clean slate next time.