Almost nobody is aware of this: this may be a sign of Alzheimer's

Alzheimers disease is the most common form of dementia, about 190,000 people have to deal with this ruthless disease.

Almost nobody is aware of this: this may be a sign of Alzheimer's
Alzheimers disease is the most common form of dementia, about 190,000 people have to deal with this ruthless disease.

This can be an Alzheimer's sign at an early stage

 

Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia, with around 190,000 people suffering from this ruthless disease. Dementia develops gradually and worsens as the disease progresses, until a patient cannot even manage basic cognitive skills such as talking and eating.

 

Forgetfulness is the most obvious symptom, but there are many other symptoms that indicate an (early) stage of Alzheimer's disease.

 

Longer in fabric

Are you suddenly a lot taller in dust during middle age and while talking? This can be an early warning that you are dealing with Alzheimer's disease. If it takes you longer than normal to get the right word, or if you suddenly need many more words to explain something, this is linked to a mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a disorder that precedes dementia.

 

Make a sentence

Scientists from the Massachusetts General Hospital conducted a study among 46 adults who were asked to make a sentence out of the words "stove," "water," and "pot." Those who were healthy managed to produce an accurate sentence. The people struggling with a mild cognitive impairment struggled with the assignment. Principal investigator Dr. Janet Cohen Sherman informed The Telegraph that there was "a very significant difference" in the length of the sentence between persons suffering from MCI and the healthy, elderly subjects.

 

Ronald Reagan

According to Sherman, these people are quickly lost when they speak, something that also occurs in healthy people. But if people suddenly tell their story in a different, more lengthy way, this is cause for concern. At a conference in Boston, Dr. Sherman cites a study of the speeches of former President Ronald Reagan, who suffered from dementia. "As time went by, he used fewer and fewer unique words, and repeated himself much more," she says. "In addition, Reagan spoke with more fill words and empty phrases, such as" things, "" something, "" in fact, "" actually, "and" well. "