A closer look at the directive - Orientation on the Infection Prevention guideline in oral care practices

A closer look at the directive - Orientation on the Infection Prevention guideline in oral care practices
An employee (dentist, dental hygienist or assistant in paid employment) can not hide behind the fact that the practitioner has provided incomplete or inadequate equipment or a shortage of instruments to apply necessary hygiene.

A closer look at the directive

 

In the KNMT guideline, a number of measures have been described on the basis of practical feasibility, cost considerations and a risk analysis, which are deemed necessary by the experts of the KNMT working group for good infection prevention in oral care. A number of measures are not scientifically based, but are based on general use in the medical world (for example, putting on clean work clothes every day). The measures described are finally (!) Authorized by all professional associations. Thanks to this broad-based approval, they have been applicable since the date of publication (April 2016) as the professional standard in the field of infection prevention in oral care. Compliance with it can not be separated from the individual professional practice by each team member individually. Everyone must take full responsibility for this, because the law stipulates that every patient is entitled to safe care.

 

An employee (dentist, dental hygienist or assistant in paid employment) can not hide behind the fact that the practitioner has provided incomplete or inadequate equipment or a shortage of instruments to apply necessary hygiene. After all, it is everyone's personal (!) Responsibility to provide safe care. In the event of inadequate equipment or a shortage of manpower to recondition, patient treatment should be postponed or, if necessary, called off, in order not to be charged for providing unsafe care; either by the inspection or by a patient.

 

Intended target group

The text contains a clear description of the intended users of the directive:

 

This guideline is written for members of the professional groups in oral care who are involved in the care of patients such as dentists, dental hygienists and prosthodontists: so all the above mentioned and their team members (such as dental assistants)

 

The snow-covered last place for dental assistants is unjustified, given that the supporting and executive power in most oral care practices is mainly found in this group of oral health care professionals.

 

In any case, the guideline is, with more than 120 pages, a lot more extensive than the 2007 version (consisted of only 23 pages). This can have a deterrent effect on employees who are less familiar with reading long texts. The formulation of main issues in separate boxes, the recommendations, is therefore a valuable addition to this new KNMT document. These frameworks are bundled in advance of the actual text and serve as a summary of the entire guideline. The temptation can therefore only occur to read the summaries and to leave the explanations in the descriptive text to the left.

 

Patients must be able to ensure that every person involved in oral care has in any way become acquainted with the entire content of the guideline in order to guarantee the provision of responsible and safe care.

 

Structure of the directive

The document is therefore mandatory costs for all employees in oral care without exception. To this end, a passage is included on page 2 that is unusual in the media country, it says:

 

The text from this publication may be reproduced, but only mentioning ...

 

After the table of contents, a list of abbreviations used follows. Some of these have long been known in oral care, others are new such as CH-1 and CH-2 for differentiation in different types of surgical procedures, FFP as the indication of the protection classes for dust masks / mouth-nose masks (Filtering Facepiece Particles), BRMO for particularly resistant micros -organisms and finally the abbreviation RDS, which is used as a concept for cleaning, disinfection and sterilization.

 

The prior mentioning of all members of the working group, their expertise, position and the organization from which they were delegated is explained further in the document with a so-called disclosure statement. Such a statement should indicate whether and to what extent interests of the individual members existed in the work for the committee. However, the list is incomplete on some points and was not always (more) current.

 

Apart from the unusual start of the document, where the summary precedes the substantiating text with the explanatory considerations and recommendations, the chapter division is well-organized and the guideline has a solid structure.